Frequent question: Do most Christians support the death penalty?

What does Christianity say about the death penalty?

Christian arguments in favour of the death penalty

Some Christians argue that the death penalty helps to maintain order and protection in society. They would say this because: The Bible sets down the death penalty for some crimes, so it must be acceptable to God. This is often seen as retribution .

Does the Bible support the death penalty?

The Bible speaks in favour of the death penalty for murder. But it also prescribes it for 35 other crimes that we no longer regard as deserving the death penalty. In order to be consistent, humanity should remove the death penalty for murder.

What religions disagree with the death penalty?

Among non-Christian faiths, teachings on the death penalty vary. The Reform and Conservative Jewish movements have advocated against the death penalty, while the Orthodox Union has called for a moratorium. Similarly, Buddhism is generally against capital punishment, although there is no official policy.

What does the Bible say about the death penalty in the New Testament?

In the Hebrew Bible, Exodus 21:12 states that “whoever strikes a man so that he dies shall be put to death.” In Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus, however, rejects the notion of retribution when he says “if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also.”

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Where in the Bible does it talk about punishment?

In Leviticus Chapter 24, verses 17 through 21 quote the Lord instructing Moses in words that uphold the death penalty and include the phrase, “If anyone injures his neighbor, whatever he has done must be done to him: fracture for fracture, eye for eye, tooth for tooth.”

Do religions support the death penalty?

Religious Preference

More than 7 in 10 Protestants (71%) support the death penalty, while 66% of Catholics support it. Fifty-seven percent of those with no religious preference favor the death penalty for murder. *Results are based on telephone interviews with 6,498 national adults, aged 18 and older, conducted Feb.